A quick look at several of UCLA's most recognized campus landmarks and gathering spots.

Royce Hall
Royce Hall

Royce Hall, named for Josiah Royce, a leading philosopher of the time, is an architectural landmark of UCLA and one of the original four buildings of the Westwood campus constructed in 1929. The building was modeled after a Milan, Italy, basilica and was designed by architect David Allison. The auditorium seats 1,833, houses an antique pipe organ and has been host to a wide variety of world renowned performing artists.

Dickson Plaza
Dickson Plaza (east of flagpole)

Looking north from Schoenberg Music Building across Dickson Plaza toward Perloff Hall. UCLA takes pride in the beauty of its 419 acre wooded campus.

Pauley Pavillion Pauley Pavilion

Pauley Pavilion, home of NCAA champion UCLA basketball, volleyball, and gymnastics teams, was named for Edwin W. Pauley, who contributed $1 million to its construction. The pavilion was first used in 1966 and seats 12,500. In 1984, it was the site of the gymnastics competition during the summer Olympics games.

Bruin Bear
Bruin Bear

Designed by Billy Fitzgerald, the Bruin Bear located in Westwood Plaza is six feet high, 10 feet long and weighs two tons. The statue was a gift from the UCLA Alumni Association in 1984, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Association. The tooth-baring bronze grizzly is a powerful and forward moving representation of the strength and progress of UCLA. It is a popular student meeting place on campus.

Royce Hall Quad
Dickson Plaza (west of flagpole)

Students crossing Dickson Plaza between Royce Hall and Powell Library. UCLA is a "walking" campus with limited automobile traffic within the central campus.

Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden

Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden

Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden

The Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden, located on 5 acres of UCLA's North Campus, is the largest outdoor sculpture gardent on the West Coast. More than 70 works by 20th century masters on exhibit are all private gifts to UCLA. The garden is a popular location for enjoying Los Angeles' warm weather.

Powell Library College Library in Powell

The Powell Library, designed by architect George Kelham and opened in 1929, is also one of the first four buildings of UCLA. The octagonal tower resembles that of the Church of St. Sepolcro in Bologna, Italy and the main entrance is based on that of the Church of San Zenove in Verona, Italy. The interior dome is 63 feet high and is supported on interlaced trusses with intricately painted ceiling panels. The recently remodeled library is home to some 150,000 volumes, over 200 computer workstations, and 800 reading seats.

Kerckhoff Hall Kerckhoff Hall

Named for William G. Kerckhoff, a very successful lumber and energy magnate, Kerckhoff Hall was finished in 1931. The Kerckhoffs visited the Westwood campus under construction in early 1929 and were told by Provost Ernest Carroll Moore of the need for a student union. On his deathbed a month later Kerckhoff told his wife that he wanted to "build that building Dr. Moore wants." Mrs. Kerckhoff spent $815,000 to build and completely furnish Kerckhoff Hall.

Palm Court

Palm Court

Located on the ground level of Bunche Hall, the Palm Court provides a tranquil setting for reading or meeting with friends.

Ackerman Union Ackerman Union

Ackerman Union, a center of student activity, houses a variety of services including the UCLA Store , restaurants, movies and an arcade. A stunning new feature to the Union is the Viewpoint Lounge with its three-story high ceiling with skylights. Architect and UCLA alumna Rebecca Binder designed the new building.

Inverted Fountain Inverted Fountain

The Inverted Fountain, completed in 1968, has a recirculating water flow of 10,000 gallons per minute and was inspired by bubbling mud pots and natural hot springs (Morning Glory Pool) in Yellowstone National Park. It was designed by Jere Hazlett.

Royce Hall Quad Fountain Royce Hall Fountain

A gift from the class of '89, the Fountain graces Janss terrace at the west end of Dickson Plaza. Designed under the direction of campus architect Charles "Duke" Oakley by senior designer Bill Gregory and designer Wes Hironaka, the fountain was completed in 1995 and is a beautiful addition to the campus.

Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden